The GovLab Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance: Issue 26

The Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance (the SCAN) is a weekly digest on Internet governance news, reports, and events produced by the Governance Lab @NYU (the GovLab) as part of the GovLab’s Living Labs on Smarter Governance project. The SCAN is cross-posted weekly from the GovLab on the Internet Policy Observatory. The original posting of the GovLab SCAN- Issue 26, May 16, 2014 can be found here.

This week’s highlights:

  • In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has voted to move forward with new proposed “Open Internet” rules which run counter to the principle of net neutrality as they would allow content providers to pay Internet Service Providers for Internet “fast-lanes”. The ruling has created massive controversy and debate, with many arguing that the FCC should find a way to classify Internet Service Providers as “common carriers” –i.e. public utilities—so that net neutrality rules can be enforced upon them.
  • In Europe, the European Court of Justice has ruled that individuals have the right to ask search engines such as Google to remove search results to information about them that they do not want to have found. The ruling has generated criticism for creating greater possibilities for private censorship and for endangering freedom of expression online.
  • ICANN has closed the public comment period for the proposed IANA transition process and accompanying scoping document. Both documents have drawn criticism from ICANN’s community for ruling out possible arrangements and options and for being insufficiently open and inclusive to the opinions of all stakeholders.
  • The U.S. House Energy and Commerce committee has approved the Domain Openness through Continued …

 

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The GovLab Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance: Issue 25

The Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance (the SCAN) is a weekly digest on Internet governance news, reports, and events produced by the Governance Lab @NYU (the GovLab) as part of the GovLab’s Living Labs on Smarter Governance project. The SCAN is cross-posted weekly from the GovLab on the Internet Policy Observatory. The original posting of the GovLab SCAN- Issue 25, May 9, 2014 can be found here.

This week’s highlights:

  • ICANN has launched two interrelated processes which are significant not only for ICANN but for the entire Internet governance ecosystem and the development of the Internet –one which will examine ICANN’s accountability structures, and the other which is to develop a proposal for transitioning stewardship of the IANA functions to the “global multistakeholder community”. These processes are both open for input from the public and are expected to be very important with regards to ICANN’s globalization as well as to the globalization of Internet governance structures and processes more broadly.
  • The White House last week published two reports concerning big data. Both are significant for raising privacy protections concerns around how data is collected, stored, and used, and for adding further momentum to larger discussions of online freedom in the U.S. and elsewhere.
  • Following the outcome document –the Multistakeholder Statement of São Paulo—of the NETmundial meeting, many Internet governance actors are in the process of developing more concrete plans for action, especially with regards to a “roadmap for the future of Internet governance”. A significant project…

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The GovLab Selected Readings on the Internet as a Global Economic Driver

As part of an ongoing effort to build a knowledge base for the field of opening governance by organizing and disseminating its learnings,  the GovLab Selected Readings series provides an annotated and curated collection of recommended works on key opening governance topics. The Governance Lab @NYU (GovLab) cross-posts weekly on CGCS’s Internet Policy ObservatoryThis edition of selected readings explores the literature on the Internet as a Global Economic Driver, the original post can be found here.

In this second installment of the GovLab Selected Readings on Internet Governance, we look at publications that explore the economic impact of Internet technologies around the world, as well as the various types of “fragmentation” that can negatively affect the Internet’s potential to develop local, national, regional, and global economies. The selected readings find, for example, that the Internet adoption is both linked to GDP-growth and that GDP-growth in turn spurs Internet adoption; that barriers to Internet connectivity directly and negatively affect economic growth; and that the Internet is playing a major role in improving the economic security of developing countries.

Selected Reading List (in alphabetical order)

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The GovLab Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance: Issue 23

The Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance (the SCAN) is a weekly digest on Internet governance news, reports, and events produced by the Governance Lab @NYU (the GovLab) as part of the GovLab’s Living Labs on Smarter Governance project. The SCAN is cross-posted weekly from the GovLab on the Internet Policy Observatory. The original posting of the GovLab SCAN- Issue 23, April 25, 2014 can be found here.

This week’s highlights:

  • The NETmundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance took place this week in São Paulo, Brazil. Thousands of different individuals from all over the world contributed to the meeting’s organization and planning; the meeting’s draft outcome documents received 1370 comments online; and 1480 stakeholders from the private, governmental, technical, academic, and civil society communities of 97 nations came together during the meeting, joined by remote participants from 30 remote participation hubs. The meeting produced a non-binding outcome document that is meant to inform all upcoming Internet governance discussions. The next GovLab SCAN will recap the outcomes of NETmundial.
  • The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has proposed new rules that would effectively end “net neutrality” provisions in the U.S. and allow Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to charge extra for some types of traffic. However, there are conditions that such extra charges should be “commercially reasonable” and that behavior harming consumers or competition will be prohibited.
  • Brazil has passed the “Marco Civil” (sometimes called Brazil’s “Internet Constitution”) which protects…

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