The GovLab Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance: Issue 28

The Selected Curation of Articles on Net-governance (the SCAN) is a weekly digest on internet governance news, reports, and events produced by the Governance Lab @NYU (the GovLab) as part of the GovLab’s Living Labs on Smarter Governance project. The SCAN is cross-posted weekly from the GovLab on the Internet Policy Observatory. The original posting of the GovLab SCAN- Issue  28, May 30, 2014 can be found here.

This week’s highlights:

  • Increasingly, international Internet technology companies face conflicting jurisdictional issues that can act as obstacles to the growth of the Internet and its potential to connect people. For example EU data protection regulations may contradict certain ICANN registrar/registry policies, creating legal challenges for companies that operate in both regions.
  • The global supply of IPv4 addresses is steadily declining and ICANN is therefore pushing for Internet companies to quickly coordinate the global transition to using IPv6 addresses.
  • The Stockholm Internet Forum –whose theme was “Internet – privacy, transparency, surveillance, and control” has just concluded. Archival information can be found here. The World Summit on the Information Society +10 High-Level Event (WSIS +10) takes place from June 10 – 13 in the International Telecommunications Union headquarters in…

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The Complex Geopolitics of Internet Governance

Julien Nocetti, a Research Fellow at the Paris-based think tank French Institute of Intenational Relations (IFRI), explores the geopolitics of internet governance. This article was originally posted on April 4, 2014 on the Valdai Discussion Club and can be found here.

On March 14th, the U.S. government announced that it would relinquish management and coordination of web addresses through the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which is indirectly led by the U.S., to a global business community, public interest groups, academics, and governments. This is likely to open a new chapter in the way the internet is “governed.”

This happened a few days before an ICANN meeting in Singapore and, perhaps more importantly, a month before NETmundial, an international conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil on the future of internet governance.

There were three signs that supervision of the internet was about to evolve towards greater internationalization in coming months.

First, U.S. moral leadership on Internet issues was destroyed by Edward Snowden’s leaks regarding Washington’s large-scale cyber surveillance and its intelligence agencies’ collusion with major internet corporations. These …

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The GovLab Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance: Issue 23

The Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance (the SCAN) is a weekly digest on Internet governance news, reports, and events produced by the Governance Lab @NYU (the GovLab) as part of the GovLab’s Living Labs on Smarter Governance project. The SCAN is cross-posted weekly from the GovLab on the Internet Policy Observatory. The original posting of the GovLab SCAN- Issue 23, April 25, 2014 can be found here.

This week’s highlights:

  • The NETmundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance took place this week in São Paulo, Brazil. Thousands of different individuals from all over the world contributed to the meeting’s organization and planning; the meeting’s draft outcome documents received 1370 comments online; and 1480 stakeholders from the private, governmental, technical, academic, and civil society communities of 97 nations came together during the meeting, joined by remote participants from 30 remote participation hubs. The meeting produced a non-binding outcome document that is meant to inform all upcoming Internet governance discussions. The next GovLab SCAN will recap the outcomes of NETmundial.
  • The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has proposed new rules that would effectively end “net neutrality” provisions in the U.S. and allow Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to charge extra for some types of traffic. However, there are conditions that such extra charges should be “commercially reasonable” and that behavior harming consumers or competition will be prohibited.
  • Brazil has passed the “Marco Civil” (sometimes called Brazil’s “Internet Constitution”) which protects…

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Calling a Bluff? Internet Governance Poker Heats up

CGCS Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Ben Wagner discusses the upcoming NETMundial conference in Brazil and questions whether ‘global forums’ actually impact the wider geopolitics of the internet.

With the coming ‘Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance’ NETmundial conference in Brazil, the debate on internet governance is heating up again. Less than two years after the ITU’s WCIT summit in Dubai and less than a year after revelations about mass NSA spying, a new attempt will be made to change the way the internet is governed. The NETmundial conference is both an attempt by the Brazilian government to find an answer to U.S. surveillance practices and an attempt to properly democratize and globalize internet governance.[1]

Recent statements by the U.S. government about changes to the IANA function, however, alter the regulatory environment and in so doing put in question the relevance of the Brazil conference as well as, such authority the conference has tried to accumulate. The U.S. government is changing the terms of the debate about global control over ICANN by, itself, soliciting proposals about the future of multistakeholder governance. The NETmundial conference was asking participants to contribute a “roadmap for the further evolution of the Internet governance ecosystem.”  What such proposals should be shift and alter as the internet governance ecosystem has already changed.

The U.S.’s decision also demonstrates, with startling effectiveness, how little such ‘global forums’ actually matter in the wider geopolitics of the internet. Particularly when the whims of the U.S. are concerned, there…

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