Internet Governance and Free Expression in Latin America: A Panel Discussion with Experts

On January 22nd, as part of the Price Media Law Moot Court Americas Regional Round, CGCS’s Internet Policy Observatory (IPO) sponsored a panel discussion entitled “Internet Governance and Free Expression in Latin America.”

Against the background of discussions about the role of the press in Latin America, including issues of regulation and free expression in Argentina, Venezuela, Ecuador and elsewhere, this Panel focused on emerging attitudes toward Internet Governance in Latin America. Panelists analyzed and discussed the most recent regional shifts in narratives and policymaking with regard to privacy, free expression, and the internet. This seminar also focused on the upcoming international NETmundial summit to be hosted in Brazil that will bring government, industry, academia, and leaders to discuss these issues. Additionally, the conversation discussed the Marco Civil da Internet (which may or not be enacted into law), its implications, as well as other changing approaches to regulation of the internet.

Panelists Eduardo Bertoni (Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information), Carolina Rossini (New America Foundation), Marcel Leonardi (Google Brazil), and Erika Watanabe Patriota (Permanent Mission of Brazil to the United Nations) discussed issues such as…

Click here for panel video.

Finding a Formula for Brazil: Representation and Legitimacy in Internet Governance

The following article is the first of a series of working papers published by the Internet Policy Observatory at CGCS. These working papers explore  global policies of the Internet with a focus on the global south. This article, developed by Milton Mueller from Syracuse University and Ben Wagner from CGCS, looks at the process running up to the Brazilian summit in April 2014, and puts these Internet governance developments into a historical context.

In the summer of 2013, Edward Snowden’s extraordinary leaks about U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance destabilized the foundations of international Internet governance. Speaking at the UN General Assembly on September 24, 2013, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff denounced NSA spying in the strongest terms, and, together with ICANN, started planning conference in Sao Paulo in April 2014 to reinvent Internet governance.

This article analyses these events and tries to make sense of what they might mean for the future of global Internet governance. It begins by looking at how the Brazil-ICANN initiative alters the political alignment of actors in the world. Second, it places these developments into a longer historical context, showing how it echoes recurring attempts to develop legitimacy and principles for Internet governance. Third, it applies…

Click here to read more.

After the IGF 2013—Bali barely relevant in the run-up to Rio

CGCS Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Ben Wagner discusses the Internet Governance Forum 2013′s relevance in the changing world of Internet Governance.

I’ve recently joined CGCS as a post-doctoral research fellow, and am currently working on a new CGCS project called the Internet Policy Observatory, a research program developed to analyse the dynamic technological and political contexts in which Internet developments and governance decisions take place.  Busy with the preoccupations of relocating across the Atlantic to begin work at Annenberg, I had to miss the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2013 in Bali. As I’ve attended every IGF since 2008, I found myself wondering what I had missed.

I’ve spent a lot of time and effort in the last few years in and around the IGF and from 2009 to 2012, running a ‘Dynamic Coalition,’ something like a working group at the IGF on Freedom of Expression and Freedom of the Media. The dynamic coalition brought together a colourful mix of individuals from civil society, business and government working on issues related to Freedom of Expression. In 2009 and 2010, some of our best years, speakers at our meetings included U.N. Special Rapporteur Frank La Rue, the Swedish Foreign Ministry speaking as Chair of the EU delegation and Sami Ben Gharbia of Nawaat.

This year I’ve been stuck to (mostly broken) remote participation, the transcripts on the IGF website and the interesting analysis of various commentators. What is notable at the IGF in 2013 is how little …

Click here to read more.

#bomdiaObama: From US Surveillance to Brazilian Internet Policy

Posted in

2013 AnOx participant, Dr. Luiz Peres-Neto, ESPM School, Brazil, analyzes the current Brazilian Internet draft regulation in light of recent surveillance revelations.

When Snowden’s revelations of US surveillance first emerged, the Brazilian government responded that they did not know if PRISM surveillance had implications on local sovereignty. At that point, Brazilian internet users began joking about the scandal by putting personal messages to President Obama on Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks, which included informal posts like “good morning”, “hey” or addressed to the US President. In this sense, “#bomdiaObama” (Good morning Obama) became a trending topic on Brazilian Twitter showing an embrace of humor as soft criticism of privacy invasion.

This scenario changed dramatically, when on July 7th, the newspaper “O Globo” published some of Snowden’s documents in which Brazil was shown as a US priority spying target, with personal data and Internet information of local users captured alongside users in China, Russia, Iran, and Pakistan[1]. After these facts emerged, Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff made a public statement and asked for formal explanations from the US government.

Snowden’s revelations led to a “window of opportunity”[2] for re-initiating discussion of a draft Internet policy regulation, Projeto de Lei 2126/2011[3], best known as “Marco Civil da Internet”…

Click here to read more.