The GovLab Selected Readings on the Internet as a Global Economic Driver

As part of an ongoing effort to build a knowledge base for the field of opening governance by organizing and disseminating its learnings,  the GovLab Selected Readings series provides an annotated and curated collection of recommended works on key opening governance topics. The Governance Lab @NYU (GovLab) cross-posts weekly on CGCS’s Internet Policy ObservatoryThis edition of selected readings explores the literature on the Internet as a Global Economic Driver, the original post can be found here.

In this second installment of the GovLab Selected Readings on Internet Governance, we look at publications that explore the economic impact of Internet technologies around the world, as well as the various types of “fragmentation” that can negatively affect the Internet’s potential to develop local, national, regional, and global economies. The selected readings find, for example, that the Internet adoption is both linked to GDP-growth and that GDP-growth in turn spurs Internet adoption; that barriers to Internet connectivity directly and negatively affect economic growth; and that the Internet is playing a major role in improving the economic security of developing countries.

Selected Reading List (in alphabetical order)

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The GovLab Selected Readings on Mapping the Internet Governance Ecosystem

As part of an ongoing effort to build a knowledge base for the field of opening governance by organizing and disseminating its learnings,  the GovLab Selected Readings series provides an annotated and curated collection of recommended works on key opening governance topics. The Governance Lab @NYU (GovLab) cross-posts weekly on CGCS’s Internet Policy ObservatoryThis edition of selected readings explores the literature on Mapping the Internet Governance Ecosystem, the original post can be found here.

Internet governance has the following generally accepted (although by no means uncontroversial) working definition drafted during the World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis in 2005: “the development and application by governments, the private sector and civil society, in their respective roles, of shared principles, norms, rules, decision-making procedures, and programmes that shape the evolution and use of the Internet.” Internet governance is often described as occurring within an “ecosystem” of institutions organized inregional, national, and global “layers” of governance. Internet governance issues are also described as “layered” – for example, the technical layer comprises elements like servers, infrastructure and protocols, while the the non-technical layer comprises issues like intellectual property rights and security. Further complicating the Internet space are the many important distinctions and interactions between the roles and responsibilities of the various Internet governance actors, like the UNICANN and the over one hundred local Internet Society chapters, to name a few.

The introduction to this Selected Reading pauses to take note of…

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